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Diamond Guide

DIAMOND GUIDE

Everyone has heard of the 4C's when buying a diamond....We would love for Croghan's Jewel Box be your 5th. 

 

Expertise:

We have two Gemologists on site who are experienced and ready to share their knowledge with you.  



Value:

We have a competitive pricing strategy in place to offer you the best possible quality to fit your budget. 



Integrity:

After 100 plus years in this business, we have deep relationships with the top diamond dealers all over the world. If we do not have the stone you are looking for, we will find it. 



Taste:

We have many beautiful antique rings as well as semi mountings in stock, or you may want to work with one of our designers and a talented master jeweler on site to create one especially for you. 

We have been making rings for 100 years so we understand the importance of scale, proportions, and metal choices as they relate to the overall design of a ring.  Our Experience in this area is truly priceless 

Privacy:

Our upstairs salon with private access offers the latest in Gemology equipment in a setting that feels like a home.  Make an appointment for a quiet experience away from the hustle and excitement of our downstairs store. 

At Croghan's Jewel Box, it's not just an engagement ring that we are selling, it's a lifetime relationship! 



 

THE FOUR C'S

 

CUT

Cut describes the angles and proportions of a diamond. Cut is graded from "Excellent" to "Poor". The better the cut, the more brilliant the diamond will appear. Cut is the only characteristic of a diamond that is not determined by nature. Many people confuse cut with the shape of a diamond. Diamonds are available in various shapes including round, square, pear, heart, cushion, marquise and oval, but cut refers to the angles and proportions a master diamond craftsman uses to reveal the potential brilliance and beauty of a diamond.

 

THE IDEAL CUT DIAMOND

Although we work with diamond dealers all over the world, there is only one known for the ideal cut diamond: Lazare Kaplan. Founded in 1903, Lazare Kaplan uses a formula for cutting diamonds to ideal proportions to create maximum beauty. A century later, all Lazare diamonds are still guaranteed to produce the optimal balance of brilliance, scintillation and fire. Please contact us for more information about the ideal cut diamond, and one of our gemologists will be in touch.

 

CLARITY

Nature ensures that every diamond is as individual as the person who wears it. Clarity depends on the presence or absence of tiny inclusions, or birthmarks, which occurred when the diamond was forming. These natural inclusions are measured on a grading scale which was established by the Gemological Institute of America, or GIA. The size, quantity, type, location, and color of a diamond’s inclusions will determine the grade. The greater a diamond’s clarity, the more rare and valuable it is.

 

COLOR

Color refers to the presence of any color in the diamond. The closer the diamond is to colorless, the higher the grade and the more valuable. White diamonds remain the most popular, even though diamonds are found in a kaleidoscope of colors. Diamonds are graded on a color scale implemented by the GIA which ranges from D (colorless) to Z. A change of one or two color grades is sometimes unnoticeable but can have a profound effect upon the price.

  

CARAT

Carat is a unit of weight for diamonds and other gemstones. Since larger diamonds are found less often in nature, value increases with carat weight. For example, a one carat diamond can cost significantly more than two half-carat diamonds of like quality. The cut and the mounting can make a diamond appear larger than its actual weight. Let us help you find the right diamond and mounting to optimize its brilliance, beauty and uniqueness. The round cut diamond is the most popular diamond shape. Due to the mechanics of its shape, the round diamond is generally superior to fancy shapes because of the proper reflection of light, maximizing potential brightness. Its 57 facet cut, divided among its crown (top), girdle (widest part) and pavilion (base), is calibrated through a precise formula to achieve the maximum brilliance. Only round diamonds are given a total cut grade from excellent to poor.

 

 

DIAMOND SHAPES

 

ROUND BRILLIANT

The round brilliant cut diamond is the most popular diamond shape. Due to the mechanics of its shape, the round diamond is generally superior to fancy shapes because of the proper reflection of light, maximizing potential brightness. Its 57 facet cut, divided among its crown (top), girdle (widest part) and pavilion (base), is calibrated through a precise formula to achieve the maximum brilliance. Only round diamonds are given a total cut grade from excellent to poor.

 

CUSHION

The cushion cut diamond combines a square cut with rounded corners, much like a pillow (hence the name). This classic cut has been around for almost 200 years, and for the first century of its existence was the most popular diamond shape. Refinements in cut have led to a recent resurgence in popularity. It typically has 57 facets.

 

 

PRINCESS

The princess cut diamond was first created in 1980. It has a square or rectangular shape, typically with square corners and numerous sparkling facets. Like round cut diamonds, princess cut diamonds are a good choice for their flexibility in working in almost any style of ring. They can have up to 78 facets.

 

EMERALD

The unique look of the emerald cut diamond is due to the step cuts of its pavilion which produce a hall of mirrors effect. The shape is usually rectangular with cut corners. It is known as a step cut because its concentric broad, flat planes resemble stair steps. It typically has 58 facets. Square shaped emerald cut diamonds are sometimes referred to as Asscher cut.

 

RADIANT

A combination of two stunning cuts, the radiant cut is said to have the fire and brilliance of a round brilliant diamond as well as the elegant, sophisticated rectangular or square shape of an emerald diamond. Its 70 facets maximize the effect.

 

OVAL

Because the oval diamond is a modified round brilliant cut, it possesses a similar fire and brilliance. However, oval cut diamonds have the added advantage of an elongated shape, which can create the illusion of greater size. Its elongated shape gives a flattering illusion of length to the hand as well. It typically has 58 facets.

 

MARQUISE

The marquise cut diamond is an elongated oval shape with pointed ends. It was commissioned by France's Louis XIV, who wanted a diamond to match the smile of the lovely Marquise de Pompadour. Because the marquise diamond is long and narrow, it can also create the illusion of greater size. Carat for carat, the marquise diamond has one of the largest surface areas of any diamond shape, making it a good choice when trying to maximize perceived size. It typically has 58 facets.

 

PEAR

A hybrid cut, combining the best of the oval and the marquise, it is shaped most like a sparkling teardrop. It typically has 58 facets. HEART The heart shaped cut is the ultimate symbol of romance. It typically has 59 facets.

 

OLDER CUTS

Many Antique rings feature older cuts such as old mine or old European. These were predecessors of the modern round brilliant cut.  They generally have a high crown,  small table, deep pavilion and large culet.  Our experts can help you navigate the unique and beautiful world of estate diamonds. 

 

 

DIAMOND CERTIFICATION

A Diamond Certificate, also called a "Diamond Grading Report" or a "Diamond Dossier," is a document containing the characteristics that make up a particular diamond's quality. A completed certificate includes an analysis of the diamond's clarity, color, cut and carat weight. The certificate provides the owner with an independent, indisputable description of the diamond's essential qualities. These are separate from, but are used in conjunction with, appraisals, which assign a value to your diamond.

At Croghan’s Jewel Box, most diamond certificates are available from one of three sources: the GIA (Gemological Institute of America), the AGS (American Gem Society Laboratories), and the EGL (European Grading Lab) 

 


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